Houseplants

Houseplants like Jasmine and Hibiscus for the Living Room

Houseplants for the living room
Michelle Tether
Written by Michelle Tether

Houseplants and the Level of Sunlight

A place with abundant light and warmth, especially in the morning, like the living room, offers and ideal environment for houseplants. You still need to put the right plants in their right places. Most indoor plants thrive as long as they are not directly placed in the scorching sunlight, particularly at midday. This article goes really well with my article on making compost from your waste materials. Why not save money when there’s an easy opportunity?

As the sun grows hotter by the hour, sunlight starts scorching the leaves. The saps will overheat and damage the cells. Be sure to move plants placed directly under a window glass, as it intensifies the heat. Desert cacti can usually take scorching heat, but take good care to protect other plants especially from the midday sun. There’s hidden benefits of planting – quick colour and you can really make a difference to the home decor on a budget. Take a look at this image from a previous post to see what effect planting can have on a dreary or dull area.

transform a room quickly with colour

Image by Haarkan transform a room quickly with colour

Houseplants for a Sunny Living Room

Here is a list of plants best suited for a sunny environment, and tips on how to take care of them as well as some lovely pictures and inspirations for your home:

Kaffir Lily (Clivia Miniata) – Its dark green leaves grow as long as 24 in (60 cm). It is a good indoor plant even if not flowering. Remember not to move them if flowers are maturing or opening. Even if it thrives in direct sunlight, it needs 6-8 weeks of winter rest period. Keep away from sun during the rest period. Keep moist during spring and autumn. In winter, keep almost dry until flower stalks appear. Remove fruits, as they reduce the plant’s ability of flowering.

Kaffir Lily

Image source – Kaffir Lily

Silky Oak (Grevillea Robusta) – This plant is ideal as an inclusion to a larger arrangement. The leaves are bronze to dark green, ferny, with their underside hairy. Keep the soil mix moist from spring to autumn, but barely moist in winter. Water with standard liquid fertiliser every two weeks during spring to summer. It thrives in direct early morning light.

Silly Oak

Silly Oak – Thanks to eBay

Chinese Hibiscus, Rose of China (Hibiscus Rosa-Sinensis) – Hibiscus is one of the few houseplants that seems to enjoy basking under a sunny windowsill. Keep the soil mix moist during spring to autumn. In winter, water sufficiently to keep soil mix from drying. Fertilise with high-potash liquid fertiliser, every two weeks from spring to summer and once a month in autumn. If plant outgrows, prune it in early spring.

Jasmine (Jasminum Polyanthun) – Jasmine is a graceful climber, its tubular flowers, pink outside and white within, heavily scented, bloom in winter and spring. Keep the soil mix moist at all times. Water with standard liquid fertiliser once a month during summer to autumn. Prune regularly and pinch out growing tips to enhance bushiness. Position jasmine where there is both direct and indirect sunlight.

Jasmine - Light

Jasmine – Lovely play with light

Oleander (Nerium Oleander) – It is a dark evergreen shrub with dark green leaves and fragrant, funnel-shaped flowers. Keep the soil mix thoroughly moist from spring to autumn, but barely moist in winter. Water with standard liquid fertiliser every two weeks during spring to summer. Keep at normal room temperature from spring to autumn, but below 60oF (15oC) and above 45oF (7oC) in winter for rest period.

Houseplants indeed give life and verve to every living room, especially if the sun works symbiotically for upkeep. The technique is to find the right plants and take good care not to overexpose them to scorching sunlight, and nourishing them constantly with water, fertilisers and, most of all, love.

About the author

Michelle Tether

Michelle Tether

I love everything home. I write as a passion for non profit about the things I love.

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